We Denounce!

“A Beautiful Kabbalat Shabbat in Tel Aviv”

By Ron Kronish

as published in The Times of Israel on August 21st, 2013

timesofisrael

“Last Friday night my wife and I went to participate in Kabbalat Shabbat (Welcoming the Sabbath) services at the Tel Aviv Port, at a beautiful spot, right next to the Mediterranean Sea, just as the sun was setting. The services are conducted by the religious leadership of Beit Tefillah Yisraeli (an Israeli House of Prayer), a new progressive religious Jewish community in Tel Aviv which seeks to combine the best of traditional Jewish texts with the best of modern Jewish Israeli songs and poems in a meaningful and contemporary fashion in a new prayer book, just published this summer.

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From Tivon to “The Other”

by Rachael Sauceda

Tal Michaelis, 29, is a Jewish Israeli who works at Variety, a non-profit organization that supports and assists children with special needs in Israel. Born and raised in in Tivon, Tal did h40482_415499396650_327112936650_5174862_7005097_ner army service just outside of Jerusalem at an absorption center, and has lived in Jerusalem for the past four years.

Growing up, Tal had a generally liberal outlook and felt that Palestinians were being treated unjustly. However, her knowledge of “the other” was limited to what she gathered from the news or learned from her father. However, until participating in an ICCI program for young adults, Tal had never really met or talked with a Palestinian.

Out of curiosity and as a result of one of Tal’s friends past participation, Tal decided to participate in ICCI’s dialogue and action group. Tal merely wanted the opportunity to talk to Palestinians in order to know Palestinian perspectives of the conflict and what their realities are like. The program that she participated in through the ICCI dealt with collective memory in Israel, Palestine and Japan. Called “From Memory to Reconciliation,” this year-long program met every month for intensive workshops and seminars. Jewish, Palestinian and Japanese students came together to learn how the national or collective memory affects conflict, and as a result, how a nation can grow despite the downward pull of the conflict. Continue reading

“A Time for Soul-Searching — Reflections on Elul and Eid Al-Fitr”

By Rabbi Ron Kronish(as published in the Huffington Post on August 8th, 2013)

“As we Jews begin the month of Elul, the month before our “High Holidays” of Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur, Muslims in Israel and around the world celebrate the holiday of Eid Al-Fitr. Our calendars, which are both lunar, often run in a parallel way, so this is no coincidence.

I would like to share a look at the Muslim tradition, as described in a blog posting which appeared on the ICCI blog a few days ago, by Haneen Samer Majadleh, one of Israel’s leading young Muslim educators and coexistence activists. Haneen is also a graduate of ICCI’s Young Adult Dialogue and Education programs, and is currently one of the participants in a delegation which we will be sending to Northern Ireland later this month. She wrote about the meaning of Eid Al-Fitr in a blog post that we posted a few days ago, as follows:According to Islamic tradition, Eid Al-Fitr marks the time to give thanks to God for helping the believers to perform their religious duties (fasting and praying) successfully. This holiday is also attributed to the conclusion of the compilation of the Quran, according to some traditions. Additionally, Al Fitr is the holiday of forgiveness, living in peace and togetherness; therefore, it is accustomed to visit friends and relatives and reconcile previous feuds on this holiday.Charity is given throughout the days of the holiday, the sick are visited at hospitals, children are given gifts and sweets are eaten. The celebrations begin with a festive meal with the extended family on the noon of the first day.
Eid Al-Fitr is one of the two most important religious holidays in Islam. It is called the “little” holiday, whereas Eid Al-Adha which is one day longer, is called the “big” holiday. (www.icci.org.il)

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Happy Eid!

Eid Mubarak!

“According to Islamic tradition, Al Fitr Holiday marks the time to give thanks to God for helping the believers to perform their religious duties (fasting and praying) successfully. This holiday is also attributed to the conclusion of the compilation of the Quran, according to some traditions. Additionally , Al Fitr is the holiday of forgiveness, living in peace and togetherness; therefore, it is accustomed to visit friends and relatives and reconcile previous feuds on this holiday.
Charity is given throughout the days of the holiday, the sick are visited at hospitals , children are given gifts and sweets are eaten. The celebrations begin with a festive meal with the extended family on the noon of the first day.
Eid Al-Fitr is one of the two most important religious holidays in Islam. It is called the “little” holiday, whereas Eid Al Adha which is one day longer, is called the “big” holiday”
– Courtesy of Haneen Samer Magadlh